Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
8 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

dtschmitz
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

Steve
Administrator
Thanks again D, for your help spreading this. Sadly, there are so many Nibiru people who are riding the woo and doom roller coaster of hysteria that will refuse to just look at this logically.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

dtschmitz
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

Steve
Administrator
dtschmitz wrote
We must persevere and remain consistent in answering all doubters' questions without attaching personalizations.

This forum is the tool and human interface for maximizing effective communications.

God Bless Lord Steven Christ.

-- Dietrich
I appreciate your integrity.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

IrOnMaN
Banned User
In reply to this post by dtschmitz
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

Steve
Administrator
IrOnMaN wrote
Tell me if I am right.

When we say Birefringence we mean double refraction. The light enters the glass  and depending on the angle that light will hit the glass, the ray is splitted to two separate  light rays. In wikipedia, says that the refractive index of the birefringent material depends on the polarisation and propagation of light.

Does polarisation has anything to do with birefringence? Light that comes from the sun and hits the glass layer is unpolarised right? After double refraction occurs, the splitted rays become polarised.

I also read that ice has also birefringence properties and we know that there is ice attached to the glass.

So if I am thinking this right. If light hits the glass layer and becomes polarised and then the polarised light hit the ice layer whose refractive index depends both on polarisation and incoming angle, then what will be the result? For example, we will see the refracted rays (sun) further apart?

Yes indeed, i mention the polarization of light in the videos on birefrigence.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

IrOnMaN
Banned User
CONTENTS DELETED
The author has deleted this message.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Please. There are not two Suns. What you see is Birefringence

Steve
Administrator
IrOnMaN wrote
Yeah, I saw the video. So, the adhered ice layer could act as an intensifying medium/factor to the double refraction phenomenon.
not sure.